Baptism by Ken Smith, ken@Trinity-Aloha.org
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Matthew 28:19
Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost:
Matthew 28:18–20 (in Context) Matthew 28 (Whole Chapter)
Acts 2:38
Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost.
Acts 2:37–39 (in Context) Acts 2 (Whole Chapter)
Acts 2:41
Then they that gladly received his word were baptized: and the same day there were added unto them about three thousand souls.
Acts 2:40–42 (in Context) Acts 2 (Whole Chapter)
Acts 8:12
But when they believed Philip preaching the things concerning the kingdom of God, and the name of Jesus Christ, they were baptized, both men and women.
Acts 8:11–13 (in Context) Acts 8 (Whole Chapter)
Acts 8:13
Then Simon himself believed also: and when he was baptized, he continued with Philip, and wondered, beholding the miracles and signs which were done.
Acts 8:12–14 (in Context) Acts 8 (Whole Chapter)
Acts 8:36
And as they went on their way, they came unto a certain water: and the eunuch said, See, here is water; what doth hinder me to be baptized?
Acts 8:35–37 (in Context) Acts 8 (Whole Chapter)
Acts 8:38
And he commanded the chariot to stand still: and they went down both into the water, both Philip and the eunuch; and he baptized him.
Acts 8:37–39 (in Context) Acts 8 (Whole Chapter)
Acts 9:18
And immediately there fell from his eyes as it had been scales: and he received sight forthwith, and arose, and was baptized.
Acts 9:17–19 (in Context) Acts 9 (Whole Chapter)
Acts 10:47
Can any man forbid water, that these should not be baptized, which have received the Holy Ghost as well as we?
Acts 10:46–48 (in Context) Acts 10 (Whole Chapter)
Acts 10:48
And he commanded them to be baptized in the name of the Lord. Then prayed they him to tarry certain days.
Acts 10:47–48 (in Context) Acts 10 (Whole Chapter)
Acts 11:16
Then remembered I the word of the Lord, how that he said, John indeed baptized with water; but ye shall be baptized with the Holy Ghost.
Acts 11:15–17 (in Context) Acts 11 (Whole Chapter)
Acts 16:15
And when she was baptized, and her household, she besought us, saying, If ye have judged me to be faithful to the Lord, come into my house, and abide there. And she constrained us.
Acts 16:14–16 (in Context) Acts 16 (Whole Chapter)
Acts 16:33
And he took them the same hour of the night, and washed their stripes; and was baptized, he and all his, straightway.
Acts 16:32–34 (in Context) Acts 16 (Whole Chapter)
Acts 18:8
And Crispus, the chief ruler of the synagogue, believed on the Lord with all his house; and many of the Corinthians hearing believed, and were baptized.
Acts 18:7–9 (in Context) Acts 18 (Whole Chapter)
Acts 19:4
Then said Paul, John verily baptized with the baptism of repentance, saying unto the people, that they should believe on him which should come after him, that is, on Christ Jesus.
Acts 19:3–5 (in Context) Acts 19 (Whole Chapter)
Acts 19:5
When they heard this, they were baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus.
Acts 19:4–6 (in Context) Acts 19 (Whole Chapter)
Acts 22:16
And now why tarriest thou? arise, and be baptized, and wash away thy sins, calling on the name of the Lord.
Acts 22:15–17 (in Context) Acts 22 (Whole Chapter)
Romans 6:3
Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into his death?
Romans 6:2–4 (in Context) Romans 6 (Whole Chapter
1 Corinthians 12:13
For by one Spirit are we all baptized into one body, whether we be Jews or Gentiles, whether we be bond or free; and have been all made to drink into one Spirit.
1 Corinthians 12:12–14 (in Context) 1 Corinthians 12 (Whole Chapter)
Galatians 3:27
For as many of you as have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ.
Galatians 3:26–28 (in Context) Galatians 3 (Whole Chapter)

Simply, As Christians we are commanded by our Lord Jesus Christ to be baptized upon our repentance and conversion. This is a witness of our death, burial and resurrection in Christ Jesus. And includes our willingness to put to death our carnal nature and live in obedience to Christ Jesus as Lord through the Holy Spirit.

Ken Smith 7-30-11


Baptism: Actually the word is a Greek word that has been assimilated into the English Language as the translators were afraid to accurately translate the word into English. The reason being that they were fearful that the "Church" in using water as a point of contact for salvation. Their clear translation would have been very disturbing and then (1611) considered heresy. The word baptism means actually, to place one thing into another as dye into a cloth. It has many meanings in the Old and New Testament as a verb to place one thing into another. The word "baptism" does not always include water in the context of its use by the prophets and apostles of our Lord Jesus Christ. That there are many uses for the word "baptism" is noted in Heb.6:2 not that the word here is plural.

Old Testament.
1. Converts into Judaism were baptized in water as a witness of their change or "adoption" into the nation of Israel.
2. A Nazarite could be release for his vows at the age of 30. Baptism was used to illustrate the release from the old and the new life as no longer a Nazarite. Also the head was shaved and 1/3 was given to the wind, 1/3 was place in the altar and 1/3 was place in the hem of his garment. I feel this is what happened at John's baptism of Jesus so as to "fulfill the law" of a Nazarite, as Jesus said.

New Testament:
3. There is the baptism where the Holy Spirit takes the new convert, in faith, to Christ and places him into the Body of Christ. (no water)
4. There is the baptism where the "elder" places the new convert in water in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. as a witness of a death, burial and resurrection that has already happened. It is an external witness
5. There is the baptism where our Lord Jesus places the believer into the Holy Spirit for power to be His witness.
6. There is the baptism of suffering for help in the purging of the fallen Adamic Nature received from our parents and generations back.
7. There is the baptism of fire for the importation of gifts and ministries for the building of the Church of Jesus Christ.

Where the Church made a mistake was in bundling all 7 types of baptisms together and making baptism a point of salvation controlled by the Church. Only Christ can save, the church can only affirm. Our Lord said that by their fruit, ye shall know them, not their certificate. Or that a tree is known by its fruit. Christians are know by 1 Cor.13.


1 Corinthians 15 (King James Version)
King James Version (KJV)

1Moreover, brethren, I declare unto you the gospel which I preached unto you, which also ye have received, and wherein ye stand;
2By which also ye are saved, if ye keep in memory what I preached unto you, unless ye have believed in vain.
3For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures;
4And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures:
5And that he was seen of Cephas, then of the twelve:
6After that, he was seen of above five hundred brethren at once; of whom the greater part remain unto this present, but some are fallen asleep.
7After that, he was seen of James; then of all the apostles.
8And last of all he was seen of me also, as of one born out of due time.
9For I am the least of the apostles, that am not meet to be called an apostle, because I persecuted the church of God.
10But by the grace of God I am what I am: and his grace which was bestowed upon me was not in vain; but I laboured more abundantly than they all: yet not I, but the grace of God which was with me.
11Therefore whether it were I or they, so we preach, and so ye believed.
12Now if Christ be preached that he rose from the dead, how say some among you that there is no resurrection of the dead?
13But if there be no resurrection of the dead, then is Christ not risen:
14And if Christ be not risen, then is our preaching vain, and your faith is also vain.
15Yea, and we are found false witnesses of God; because we have testified of God that he raised up Christ: whom he raised not up, if so be that the dead rise not.
16For if the dead rise not, then is not Christ raised:
17And if Christ be not raised, your faith is vain; ye are yet in your sins.
18Then they also which are fallen asleep in Christ are perished.
19If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men most miserable.
20But now is Christ risen from the dead, and become the firstfruits of them that slept.
21For since by man came death, by man came also the resurrection of the dead.
22For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive.
23But every man in his own order: Christ the firstfruits; afterward they that are Christ's at his coming.
24Then cometh the end, when he shall have delivered up the kingdom to God, even the Father; when he shall have put down all rule and all authority and power.
25For he must reign, till he hath put all enemies under his feet.
26The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death.
27For he hath put all things under his feet. But when he saith all things are put under him, it is manifest that he is excepted, which did put all things under him.
28And when all things shall be subdued unto him, then shall the Son also himself be subject unto him that put all things under him, that God may be all in all.
29Else what shall they do which are baptized for the dead, if the dead rise not at all? why are they then baptized for the dead?
30And why stand we in jeopardy every hour?
31I protest by your rejoicing which I have in Christ Jesus our Lord, I die daily.
32If after the manner of men I have fought with beasts at Ephesus, what advantageth it me, if the dead rise not? let us eat and drink; for to morrow we die.
33Be not deceived: evil communications corrupt good manners.
34Awake to righteousness, and sin not; for some have not the knowledge of God: I speak this to your shame.
35But some man will say, How are the dead raised up? and with what body do they come?
36Thou fool, that which thou sowest is not quickened, except it die:
37And that which thou sowest, thou sowest not that body that shall be, but bare grain, it may chance of wheat, or of some other grain:
38But God giveth it a body as it hath pleased him, and to every seed his own body.
39All flesh is not the same flesh: but there is one kind of flesh of men, another flesh of beasts, another of fishes, and another of birds.
40There are also celestial bodies, and bodies terrestrial: but the glory of the celestial is one, and the glory of the terrestrial is another.
41There is one glory of the sun, and another glory of the moon, and another glory of the stars: for one star differeth from another star in glory.
42So also is the resurrection of the dead. It is sown in corruption; it is raised in incorruption:
43It is sown in dishonour; it is raised in glory: it is sown in weakness; it is raised in power:
44It is sown a natural body; it is raised a spiritual body. There is a natural body, and there is a spiritual body.
45And so it is written, The first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam was made a quickening spirit.
46Howbeit that was not first which is spiritual, but that which is natural; and afterward that which is spiritual.
47The first man is of the earth, earthy; the second man is the Lord from heaven.
48As is the earthy, such are they also that are earthy: and as is the heavenly, such are they also that are heavenly.
49And as we have borne the image of the earthy, we shall also bear the image of the heavenly.
50Now this I say, brethren, that flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God; neither doth corruption inherit incorruption.
51Behold, I shew you a mystery; We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed,
52In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trump: for the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed.
53For this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality.
54So when this corruptible shall have put on incorruption, and this mortal shall have put on immortality, then shall be brought to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory.
55O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory?
56The sting of death is sin; and the strength of sin is the law.
57But thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.
58Therefore, my beloved brethren, be ye stedfast, unmoveable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye know that your labour is not in vain in the Lord.


Baptism: A Greek verb meaning to place one thing in another like dye in a cloth.
by J. B. Nicholson, Jr.

The subject of baptism has been called "the troubled waters of the Church." There are many opinions about the subject. But we cannot just ignore it, because the Lord Jesus told His followers in His Great Commission to "make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost" (Matthew 28:19–20). So the Lord wanted His disciples, as they went throughout the world with the gospel, to baptize those who received the message. This raises two questions. How was baptism carried out and what does it mean?

 

HOW WAS BAPTISM CARRIED OUT?

It would be good to first understand the meaning of the word. "Baptize" and "baptism" are simply English forms of the Greek word, baptizo or baptisma. These come from a root word, bapto, to dip or immerse. The word was used among the Greeks to speak of drawing water by dipping one vessel into another, or the dyeing of clothing–which obviously would not be sprinkled, but would be taken through the process which W. E. Vine describes as "immersion, submersion and emergence." In other words, it would be put completely under. This is appropriate since the believer is portraying his own burial as a sinner and then coming out of the grave with new life in Christ.

We have an example of baptism described in Acts 8:26–39. A civil servant from Ethiopia had come to Jerusalem as an honest seeker for truth. He was returning home in his chariot, reading a copy of the book of Isaiah. The Lord sent Philip, an evangelist, to explain the gospel to him. As Philip rode beside the Ethiopian in the chariot, he explained that the suffering Servant of God foretold in Isaiah 53 was the Lord Jesus who had died at Calvary so that sinners might be saved. This traveler believed on the Lord Jesus as his personal Saviour and then asked to be baptized. Philip agreed because the Ethiopian made confession that he truly believed.

Now notice Acts 8:38–39. "And he commanded the chariot to stand still: and they went down both into the water, both Philip and the eunuch; and he baptized him. And when they were come up out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord caught away Philip, that the eunuch saw him no more: and he went on his way rejoicing."

 

WHAT IS THE SIGNIFICANCE OF BAPTISM?

It is a public act showing my obedience to the Lord Jesus Christ (Matthew 28:19). I want others to know that I have chosen to follow Him. Only true believers should be baptized (Acts 18:8). In the New Testament two things are never presumed: a baptized unbeliever or an unbaptized believer (the thief on the cross is an exception for an obvious reason).

Baptism gives the believer a good conscience in obeying Christ's command. Baptism is not a means of washing away sin, or as Peter puts it "not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God" (1 Peter 3:21), because the believer knows he has done the will of God.

It is an outward picture of something inward that has happened to the believer in the Lord Jesus (Romans 6:3–5). When Christ died on the cross, He died as a substitute for sinners. When I accept Him as my substitute, it is just as if I died. So by going under the waters of baptism, I am saying, When Christ died, I died. When He was buried, I was buried. When He rose from the dead, I rose too, and now walk in a new kind of life––eternal life.

 

FOUR OTHER USES OF "BAPTISM" IN THE NEW TESTAMENT:

The ministry of John the Baptist: This John was sent to prepare the way for the coming of the Lord Jesus to earth. He did so by preaching that the people needed to repent of their sins and then show they believed this message by being baptized by John in the Jordan River. The Jordan (meaning, coming down from the judge) was a picture of death. Because "the wages of sin is death" (Romans 3:23), these people were showing that they understood they deserved to die. But by taking their sin seriously, they prepared their hearts for receiving the Messiah who was coming.

When Jesus did come, and asked John to baptize Him, John did not think it was right to baptize Him, but the Lord insisted, "to fulfill all righteousness" and to show that His purpose in coming into the world was to die for our sins.

The baptism of the Lord Jesus on the Cross: "Are you able to drink of the cup that I shall drink of, and to be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?" (Matthew 20:22), Jesus asked His disciples. The Lord Jesus was thinking about the time when He would go under the waves of judgment for our sin (Psalm 42:7). In Luke 12:50, He said, "But I have a baptism to be baptized with; and I am greatly distressed until it is accomplished!" We all need to ask: If He was willing to go through such a baptism of wrath for us, should we not be willing to go through water baptism for Him, if that is what He wants?

The baptism of believers in the Lord Jesus by the Holy Spirit: John said, "I indeed baptize you with water; but one mightier than I is coming. He shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost and with fire" (Luke 3:16). The baptism of the Spirit occurred at the birth of the Church, recorded in Acts 2. Paul describes this in 1 Corinthians 12:13, "For by one Spirit were we all baptized into one body, whether Jews or Gentiles, whether bond or free; and have been all made to drink into one Spirit."

On the day of Pentecost, 120 individual believers went into a room in Jerusalem; when they came out, they had been made "one body." The Person of the Holy Spirit is the link now between every believer and every other believer, making "the unity of the Spirit" (Ephesians 4:3).

The crossing of the Red Sea by the children of Israel: The Israelites "were all baptized unto Moses in the cloud and in the sea" (1 Corinthians 10:2). Though baptized to a new leader, leaving the forces of Pharaoh in the water as it flowed back in judgment, they did not follow through in obedience. "But with many of them God was not well pleased: for they were overthrown in the wilderness" (verse 5).

This, says Paul (verse 6), is a warning to others that it is possible to be redeemed and baptized but not to go on in a life that pleases the Lord. We need to heed the following warnings against lust, idolatry, fornication, tempting Christ and murmuring (verses 6–10). But following that is an encouraging promise: "No temptation has overtaken you but such as is common to man: but God is faithful, who will not allow you to be tempted above what you are able; but will with the temptation also make a way to escape, that you may be able to bear it" (1 Corinthians 10:13).

The subject of baptism has been called "the troubled waters of the Church." There are many opinions about the subject. But we cannot just ignore it, because the Lord Jesus told His followers in His Great Commission to "make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost" (Matthew 28:19–20). So the Lord wanted His disciples, as they went throughout the world with the gospel, to baptize those who received the message. This raises two questions. How was baptism carried out and what does it mean?

 

HOW WAS BAPTISM CARRIED OUT?

It would be good to first understand the meaning of the word. "Baptize" and "baptism" are simply English forms of the Greek word, baptizo or baptisma. These come from a root word, bapto, to dip or immerse. The word was used among the Greeks to speak of drawing water by dipping one vessel into another, or the dyeing of clothing–which obviously would not be sprinkled, but would be taken through the process which W. E. Vine describes as "immersion, submersion and emergence." In other words, it would be put completely under. This is appropriate since the believer is portraying his own burial as a sinner and then coming out of the grave with new life in Christ.

We have an example of baptism described in Acts 8:26–39. A civil servant from Ethiopia had come to Jerusalem as an honest seeker for truth. He was returning home in his chariot, reading a copy of the book of Isaiah. The Lord sent Philip, an evangelist, to explain the gospel to him. As Philip rode beside the Ethiopian in the chariot, he explained that the suffering Servant of God foretold in Isaiah 53 was the Lord Jesus who had died at Calvary so that sinners might be saved. This traveler believed on the Lord Jesus as his personal Saviour and then asked to be baptized. Philip agreed because the Ethiopian made confession that he truly believed.

Now notice Acts 8:38–39. "And he commanded the chariot to stand still: and they went down both into the water, both Philip and the eunuch; and he baptized him. And when they were come up out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord caught away Philip, that the eunuch saw him no more: and he went on his way rejoicing."

 

WHAT IS THE SIGNIFICANCE OF BAPTISM?

It is a public act showing my obedience to the Lord Jesus Christ (Matthew 28:19). I want others to know that I have chosen to follow Him. Only true believers should be baptized (Acts 18:8). In the New Testament two things are never presumed: a baptized unbeliever or an unbaptized believer (the thief on the cross is an exception for an obvious reason).

Baptism gives the believer a good conscience in obeying Christ's command. Baptism is not a means of washing away sin, or as Peter puts it "not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God" (1 Peter 3:21), because the believer knows he has done the will of God.

It is an outward picture of something inward that has happened to the believer in the Lord Jesus (Romans 6:3–5). When Christ died on the cross, He died as a substitute for sinners. When I accept Him as my substitute, it is just as if I died. So by going under the waters of baptism, I am saying, When Christ died, I died. When He was buried, I was buried. When He rose from the dead, I rose too, and now walk in a new kind of life––eternal life.

 

FOUR OTHER USES OF "BAPTISM" IN THE NEW TESTAMENT:

The ministry of John the Baptist: This John was sent to prepare the way for the coming of the Lord Jesus to earth. He did so by preaching that the people needed to repent of their sins and then show they believed this message by being baptized by John in the Jordan River. The Jordan (meaning, coming down from the judge) was a picture of death. Because "the wages of sin is death" (Romans 3:23), these people were showing that they understood they deserved to die. But by taking their sin seriously, they prepared their hearts for receiving the Messiah who was coming.

When Jesus did come, and asked John to baptize Him, John did not think it was right to baptize Him, but the Lord insisted, "to fulfill all righteousness" and to show that His purpose in coming into the world was to die for our sins.

The baptism of the Lord Jesus on the Cross: "Are you able to drink of the cup that I shall drink of, and to be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?" (Matthew 20:22), Jesus asked His disciples. The Lord Jesus was thinking about the time when He would go under the waves of judgment for our sin (Psalm 42:7). In Luke 12:50, He said, "But I have a baptism to be baptized with; and I am greatly distressed until it is accomplished!" We all need to ask: If He was willing to go through such a baptism of wrath for us, should we not be willing to go through water baptism for Him, if that is what He wants?

The baptism of believers in the Lord Jesus by the Holy Spirit: John said, "I indeed baptize you with water; but one mightier than I is coming. He shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost and with fire" (Luke 3:16). The baptism of the Spirit occurred at the birth of the Church, recorded in Acts 2. Paul describes this in 1 Corinthians 12:13, "For by one Spirit were we all baptized into one body, whether Jews or Gentiles, whether bond or free; and have been all made to drink into one Spirit."

On the day of Pentecost, 120 individual believers went into a room in Jerusalem; when they came out, they had been made "one body." The Person of the Holy Spirit is the link now between every believer and every other believer, making "the unity of the Spirit" (Ephesians 4:3).

The crossing of the Red Sea by the children of Israel: The Israelites "were all baptized unto Moses in the cloud and in the sea" (1 Corinthians 10:2). Though baptized to a new leader, leaving the forces of Pharaoh in the water as it flowed back in judgment, they did not follow through in obedience. "But with many of them God was not well pleased: for they were overthrown in the wilderness" (verse 5).

This, says Paul (verse 6), is a warning to others that it is possible to be redeemed and baptized but not to go on in a life that pleases the Lord. We need to heed the following warnings against lust, idolatry, fornication, tempting Christ and murmuring (verses 6–10). But following that is an encouraging promise: "No temptation has overtaken you but such as is common to man: but God is faithful, who will not allow you to be tempted above what you are able; but will with the temptation also make a way to escape, that you may be able to bear it" (1 Corinthians 10:13).


Baptism 4-18-10

Aloha Pastor David,
This is not a major issue as basically I am sure we totally agree concerning that it is not water that saves but a clear conscience towards God through Jesus Christ our Lord.

But I do get a little edgy when the word baptism is used in a general context rather than the specific contexts as found in the Holy Scriptures. This is because the word baptism is used in so many different contexts in the Old and New Testaments.

Where we do agree:
A person comes into the experience of salvation by faith and through grace by the ministry of the Word of God in Faith, Heb.11, Rom.10:9–10. "The Thief on the Cross."

Due to my own experience, I usually ask if a new convert feels the need to be Baptized? If they tell me of a previous Baptism then I ask if they feel they are presently Baptized. If they feel they are, then that is good enough for me. But if they say they do not feel baptized then I explore and usually end up with them receiving a Greek Style Baptism by full immersion, three times forward in a kneeling position. There is never any question concerning the Baptism issue ever again. So I simply try to flow in the Holy Spirit and not pre–determine the comfort zone of that new soul in Christ Jesus or prempt what the Holy Spirit wants to do with them.

My experience was that at 19 month I was taken to an Episcopal Church in Frankfort, KY. by my father and baptized by a Dr. Baxter as an Episcopalian. I have a vivid memory of the details to share later. But I really thought that I was the Ky. Fried Chicken for dinner as the water was poured over my head in that big margle bowl and I went screaming out of there and threw rocks later at Dr. Baxter as he came out the door after services. Went in a dry sinner, came out a wet sinner. (soil one) Again when I was 16 I hit the sawdust trail and gave my heart to Jesus and was baptized again as a Methodist this time. It lasted about 6 months. I never did repent for or stop sleeping with my girl friend. (soil two) But then at 22 I finally really met the Lord Jesus Christ and was baptized as a Christian at a Grace Brethren Church in Long Beach. (good soil, finally)...

I fully realize this is totally subjective but I feel deeply that empty hands and water can be placed on empty heads and all that happens is a very poor bath. I do not have a problem with children being baptized all though I would much rather see them anointed with oil and blessed and allowed to grow up to the place when the experience of Baptism is desired and meaningful for them. As Children of at least one Faithful parent they are already sanctified so can not be lost until they come to the age of accountability anyway. They are already covered by the blood, so can water do any more for them? I fully realize this is a basic tradition of the Lutheran Church and no doubt the children of the Philippian Jailer and the household of Cornelius were included in the baptisms of their respective families. So again I do not have an issue but mostly wanted you to know my head space.

Baptism:

I see many times the word baptism is used in the Holy Scriptures, like using the word run in our English:
O.T.
1.) Gentile prosolytes coming into the covenant of Abraham were baptized in the Temple Lavor.
2.) Seem I remember that Nazarines could be released from their vows at age 30 with a hair cut and baptism. I personally believe that this is what our Lord meant as He said to"fulfill all the law."
3.) John the Baptist was baptizing for repentance in preparing the way for the coming of the Messiah.
All so baptized, except for our Lord Jesus, were re–baptized as they were made members of the Church.
N.T.
Baptism of the Holy Spirit where He places a believer into the Body of Christ. 1 Cor.12:13 (new life)
Baptism into death, burial and resurrection. Acts 8:38, Romans 6:2–4, 10–9–10, 1 Pet.3:21 (water witness)
Baptism into the Holy Spirit by the Lord Jesus Christ. Matt.3:11, Luke 3:16, Acts 1:8, 19:6, (for power)
Baptism in Fire for ministry: Matt.3:11, Acts 2:3, Heb.1:7.
Baptism of suffering, Mark 10:38–40, Luke 49:51,

Obviously Water Baptism seem a sealing as an outward witness, Rom.10:9–10 as it can not, in itself save: 1 Cor.1:17 as we both know and are in agreement. As to the grace administered and prayers, I am sure they are helpful. But it would seem like an anointing with oil and prayer would also be just as helpful?

Perhaps the Early Church Fathers did not really get it all sorted out but just lumped every place where the word baptism (saturate, dye into a clothe) was used into a church tradition. I am still into a study concerning the various uses of the word "Baptism." as in the related gifts from our Lord Jesus Christ.

I am really enjoying sharing services with you and would possible be interested in evangelism as a starting point. I am sure you have other men with the same calling. There is a real need in the church for the 20–40 bunch along with the college age and the high school. I really don't believe in catering to the world's standards in music and games and such to drag the kids or young adults. But if the design that our Lord Jesus used and gave us was implemented it would expand very quickly due to the deliverance and freedom and power shared by the Holy Spirit. It might be uncomfortable for some of the older folks. They would eventually find themselves sitting on a pile of hot coals but that goes with the turf in evangelism. The Holy Spirit is not known for making everyone comfortable when He is allowed to begin to move in power.

Nothing set in cement, so please just delete if this is offensive. His Love allows for doctrine to be considered from all sides.. In Love. Much love in Jesus, Ken <><

Biblical and apostolic tradition


After Jesus' death, baptism became a sign of entry into the Christian faith. Some 3,000 Jews in Jerusalem were reportedly baptized as believers at Pentecost (Acts 2:41). Other baptisms described in the New Testament include the baptism of converts in Samaria, (Acts 8:12–13) an Ethiopian eunuch, (Acts 8:36–40), Saul (Paul) of Tarsus (Acts 9:18), the household of Cornelius (Acts 10:47–48), Lydia's household (Acts 16:15), the Philippi jailer's household (Acts 16:33), and various Corinthians (Acts 18:8; 1 Corinthians 1:14–16).

None of these accounts gives an exact description of how baptism was administered, although Acts 8:38 says that "both Philip and the eunuch went down into the water, and he baptized him." Paul used the figure of speech of "burial" in connection with baptism in Romans 6:4"We have been buried with him by baptism into death, so that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life." Colossians 2:12 likewise states: "When you were buried with him in baptism, you were also raised with him through faith in the power of God, who raised him from the dead." The idea of baptism thus came to take on the meaning of being initiated into the Christian faith by dying to one's old self and being reborn "in Christ."

A number of scholars believe that immersion, whether partial or complete, was the dominant mode of baptism in the early church, although other forms were also admitted in certain circumstances. In imitation of the baptism of Jesus himself in the Jordan River, early Christians preferred rivers for performing baptisms, and this was also suitable for the baptism of large crowds. Another reason for this preference is that running water was also preferred in the Jewish tradition ritual immersion. Christian writers of the second and third centuries such as Justin, Clement of Rome, Victor I, and Tertullian remarked that seas, lakes, ponds and springs are equally proper baptismal sites.

Controversy exists regarding whether baptism is to be administered in the name of Jesus, or in the name of the Trinity. The Book of Acts refers several times to baptism in the name of Jesus (2:38, 8:16, 10:48, 19:5). However, most traditions adopt the formula given in the so–called "Great Commission," in which the risen Jesus commands his disciples: "Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit" (Matthew 28:19).

In the apostolic age, the majority of new Christians were adult converts, but soon many Christians had children whom they wanted to include in the grace of salvation, and thus infant baptism become the prevalent custom in the Catholic and Orthodox churches.

Outside of the Bible, probably the earliest known written instructions for administering baptism is that of the anonymous book known as the Didache, or Teaching of the Twelve Apostles, which most scholars date to about the year 100. It gives the following instruction:

Concerning baptism, baptize this way: Having first said all these things, baptize into the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, in living water [that is, in running water, as in a river]. But if you have no living water, baptize into other water; and if you cannot do so in cold water, do so in warm. But if you have neither, pour out water three times upon the head into the name of Father and Son and Holy Spirit.

We are most interested in receiving your comments.  Blessings,   Abbot +John <><,   Ken@Trinity-Aloha.org

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